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Creating an aids free future in The Americas and The Carribean

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Creating an aids free future in Africa, Asia and Europe

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D nate

No More AIDS Deaths

HIV medicines are now available for as little as $100 a year. Enlightened donors, NGOs and governments have made them available to over 21.7 million people living with HIV. These medicines not only save lives, they make people living with the virus up to 96% less infectious. So it turns out compassion for those who are sick has also been the best prevention plan. We fund programmes that expand affordable, quality medical treatment to reach those who urgently need help and are still waiting.

The Statistics

940k

Number of AIDS related deaths last year 

47%

Reduction in the number of AIDS-related deaths required to reach UNAIDS 2020 goal

x3

The number of adolescents dying due to AIDS-related illnesses tripled between 2000 and 2015

Our Response

It is hard to comprehend how many people in the 1980s died from AIDS with very little medical treatment. It was an epidemic that governments were underprepared for and scientists had little response to. Before HIV treatment was available, the only form of medical support provided for people with AIDS was home based, palliative care to offer a more comfortable journey towards death, to ease the pain from the symptoms of AIDS.

We were one of the first charities to fund home based care programmes during the devastating time of the early 90s and by the end of this period, we had directly provided home care for over one million people living with AIDS in the UK, South Africa, Uganda and Zambia.

Today with the advances in modern medicine, we are much closer to our end goal. We know we can help create an AIDS free future through the programmes that we fund – treatment programmes that are accessible and effective in reducing the numbers of people living with HIV/AIDS and above all that are affordable so that no one is denied access to medical treatment.

From improved diagnostic systems and wider use of mobile services in remote areas, to better flow of medicines and expertise. We fund work as far and wide as possible that helps expand and improve life saving treatment. By showing compassion to those still in need, we believe this disease can be stopped.

Our Progress

155k

People have accessed HIV treatment through programmes we've funded since 2010

53%

Decrease in AIDS related deaths in 2016 compared to 2005

58k

More patients linked to treatment programmes in 2017 because of our support

Case Study

SUPPORTING YOUNG PEOPLE IN UGANDA

SUPPORTING YOUNG PEOPLE IN UGANDA

Whilst we have made huge progress in reducing AIDS-related deaths around the world – a reduction of more than 51% since the peak in 2004 - AIDS remains the leading cause of death among young people in Africa, and the second leading cause globally.

270k

adolescents we supported in Africa in 2017

Many young people living with HIV were infected in the womb before they were born and before treatment to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV became widely available. Others acquired HIV through their first few, sometimes forced, sexual encounters. In Eastern and Southern Africa, young women (15-24 years) are twice as likely to be living with HIV than young men. Because of stigma and violence, young people who may have HIV stay hidden and rarely get the life-saving support they need. While HIV infections are on the decline in other age groups, the rates of infection and deaths among young people are rising.

Anti-retroviral treatment (ART) allows those living with HIV to live healthy lives and significantly reduces the chances of someone passing the virus on to others. The success of treatment is however, dependent on ART being taken regularly. Despite the vulnerability of young people to HIV, there are an insufficient number of adolescent-friendly services available. Many healthcare providers lack the experience and knowledge of how to adequately support young people: they may not understand the needs of adolescents living with HIV and may have judgmental attitudes towards those who are sexually active. Through our programmes for adolescents we are ensuring that young people have access to age-appropriate services which keep them and their loved ones healthy.

Our partnership with the Infectious Disease Institute at Makerere University in Kampala has, so far, provided support for over 90,000 young people between the ages of 10 through 19. The programme seeks to identify children that are living with HIV via an outreach team who work with parents or guardians to provide HIV testing in communities.

For those who test positive, the programme provides wrap around support and helps to ensure the participants fully understand HIV and how to live healthily following a diagnosis. Further support comes in the form of regular counselling, local dialogue clubs, social events, and skills training. Peer-group support groups – where the main aim is to reinforce HIV prevention, positive living and adherence to HIV treatment – are also a vital part of this programme.

Sara Naava – 19 years, from Kampala, Uganda:

“When I left school, I got a job in a small business. On the first day of work the boss called me into his office and raped me. I escaped and ran home, too ashamed to tell my mother what had happened. Some months after the rape, I was falling ill and went to the hospital to be checked. At the clinic I revealed I was raped. The counsellor was very understanding. I was placed on a programme of the ARV drugs, which I hide from my mother and siblings. Being in the EJAF programme these last months has boosted my confidence, generated by the very sympathetic counsellors. I am now in a community of others living with the virus where we can talk openly to one another and not be in fear of being bullied or stigmatised.”

In 2017 we supported over 270,000 adolescents in Africa like Sara. Our partnership with the Infectious Disease Institute has so far tested over 440,000 adolescents for HIV in Uganda and with the help of their peers and adolescent friendly staff, has supported 7,000 children and young people to begin HIV treatment.

Our Goals

AIDS is the most devastating modern day disease. Our vision today, along with thousands around the world, is to create an AIDS free future through science, support and most of all compassion.

No More Discrimination

Stigma is still HIV's most deadly symptom. We have cheap, easy ways to test for HIV, and ever more effective drugs to treat the HIV virus. We cannot use them if people living with or very vulnerable to HIV are shunned, hidden, or denied their human rights. Compassion cures discrimination. It needs no special training or qualifications, just a belief that all people deserve the chance to protect themselves and others. Without compassion, we cannot create an AIDS free future.

No More HIV infections

We fund a huge range of projects - from mobile testing units at football matches to sending SMS text reminders to pregnant women. They all make HIV testing easy, affordable, reliable and above all are offered to everyone without judgement or discrimination. It's essential that HIV testing is a routine part of public health. The work we fund is always linked to national systems, and we lobby governments ensure the structures are in place to maintain and expand them.

No More AIDS Deaths

HIV medicines are now available for as little as $100 a year. Enlightened donors, NGOs and governments have made them available to over 16 million people living with HIV. These medicines not only save lives, they make people living with the virus up to 96% less infectious. So it turns out compassion for those who are sick has also been the best prevention plan. We fund programmes that expand affordable, quality medical treatment to reach those who urgently need help and are still waiting.

Ways you can help

At the Elton John AIDS Foundation we believe that AIDS can be beaten. Our goal is to create an AIDS free future for everybody in this world. With enough support, love and creativity, we know this is possible.